Season of the Witch: Magic, Mystery & Mayhem

Season of the Witch: Magic, Mystery & Mayhem

Who doesn’t love a good mystery? That book you pick up and just can’t put down. The one that has you on the edge of your seat, that grabs you and won’t let go. Now that the nights are longer and colder and Halloween just around the corner, what better time pick up a good read that goes bump in the night.

In this season of magic and mystery, immerse yourself in a good psychological thriller, a heart-stopping horror story, the genre of vampires or witches, or just a plain out spooky ghost tale to get you in the spirit.
Trick or Treat!

 

Cell

Cell

Stephen King’s triumphant, blood-spattered return to the genre that made him famous. Cell, the king of horror’s homage to zombie films, is his goriest, most horrific novel in years, not to mention the most intensely paced. Casting aside his love of elaborate character and town histories and penchant for delayed gratification, King yanks readers off their feet within the first few pages; dragging them into the fray and offering no chance catch their breath until the very last page.


Ghost Story

Ghost Story

It began shortly after the party at which one of their members, Edward Wanderley, had died – or was killed. The Chowder Society, who for years had met in customary evening dress with the object of telling each other tales of every kind, now found themselves drawn towards the supernatural. It was some sort of solace for Edward’s loss. They began to tell ghost stories, extraordinary ghost stories… ghost stories that did not always stop when the teller finished speaking. Then came the dreams, shared simultaneously by the Chowder Society members, forecasting horrors the four ageing men can scarcely bring themselves to discuss. And now they are about to learn what happens to those who believe they can bury the past – and get away with murder.


Coraline

Coraline

When Coraline moves with her parents to a new house she is fascinated by the fact that their ‘house’ is in fact only half a house! Divided into flats years before, there is a brick wall behind a door where once there was a corridor and one day it is a corridor again, down which the intrepid Coraline wanders. And so a nightmarish mystery begins that takes Coraline into the arms of counterfeit parents and a life that isn’t quite right. Can Coraline get out? Will life ever be the same again? This book will send a shiver down your spine, out through your shoes and into a taxi to the airport. It has the delicate horror of the finest fairy tales, and it is a masterpiece.


Smoke and Mirrors

Smoke and Mirrors

In Smoke and Mirrors, children’s fairy tales take a gruesome turn when two missing children are found dead in the woods in a parody of the Hansel and Gretel story, their bodies marked by a trail of candy. The victims appear to be part of a group of youngsters who are turning classic fairy tales upside down and creating their own spin on the plots, then enacting them at a homegrown children’s theater. One of the victims, 11-year-old Annie Francis, appears to be the creative mind behind the stories, inspired perhaps by her grammar school teacher, Miss Young, whose imagination may be outpacing her good judgment… Everyone is interconnected, and even the victims’ motives may be cloudy. An inventive backstory and threads of connection elevate the story above the ordinary run of mystery novels.


In Cold Blood

In Cold Blood

A small article in the corner of a page of The New York Times led to a new genre. When Truman Capote read a piece about how all four members of the Clutter family had been murdered in their home, it piqued his interest. The family was well-respected and the police had no obvious motives for the murders. Capote, in the ultimate act of culture shock, went to Kansas to investigate. Kansas had its share of culture shock too. They didn’t have bon vivants in Kansas. They could barely spell it. To break through and communicate with the natives, Capote recruited Harper Lee (of To Kill a Mockingbird fame) to translate to the foreigners. It worked and Capote was allowed to follow the investigation and interview the two killers. While there’s been some speculation in recent years about the level of accuracy in the book, Capote’s style created a new genre that still fascinates readers today.