Gardening Anywhere

Welcome Spring! The days are getting longer and the temps are warming after the last gasp of winter. Time to start thinking about cultivating the garden. Will it be food, flowers, both? Are you an urban gardener, have a sprawling backyard, a patch of dirt, or maybe a community garden you visit once a week.

Planting for the beauty of an ornamental garden. Growing organic produce to nurture your body and soul. An herb garden on your kitchen windowsill? A sapling to replace the tree that fell in the last storm.

Gardening for the pure fun of it. From lawn trees to vegetable gardens, the possibilities are endless. Get your hands dirty and get growing!

 

The Edible Garden: How to Have Your Garden and Eat It, Too

The Edible Garden: How to Have Your Garden and Eat It, Too

In this timely new book, BBC star Alys Fowler shows that there is a way to take the good life and re-fashion it to fit in with life in the city. Abandoning the limitations of traditional gardening methods, she has created a beautifully productive garden where tomatoes sit happily next to roses, carrots are woven between the lavenders and potatoes grow in pots on the patio. And all of this is produced in a way that mimics natural systems, producing delicious homegrown food for her table. And she shares her favorite recipes for the hearty dishes, pickles and jams she makes to use up her bountiful harvest, proving that no-one need go hungry on her grow-your-own regime. Good for the pocket, good for the environment and hugely rewarding for the soul, “The Edible Garden” urges urbanites everywhere to chuck out the old gardening rules and create their own haven that’s as good to look at as it is to eat.


The Cut Flower Patch: Grow Your Own Cut Flowers All Year Round

The Cut Flower Patch: Grow Your Own Cut Flowers All Year Round

Louise Curley looks at what makes a great cut flower, ideal conditions and soil and the tools you’ll need. There is advice on what to grow — from favorite hardy annuals, half hardies and biennials to spring and summer bulbs to adding foliage and fillers to balance arrangements — and advice on how and when to sow, how to support your plants and tips on weeding, deadheading, pests and feeding.


Small-Space Container Gardens: Transform Your Balcony, Porch, or Patio with Fruits, Flowers, Foliage & Herbs

Small-Space Container Gardens: Transform Your Balcony, Porch, or Patio with Fruits, Flowers, Foliage & Herbs

This exciting guide layers practical gardening fundamentals with creative solutions that encourage thinking outside the pot. Maybe this means repurposing a shipping pallet to create a colorful vertical garden of nasturtiums and lobelia. Or simply seeing walls, rafters, railings, and everything in-between as fair game. It’s in these containers–traditional or not–that you’ll cultivate your own food, attract beneficial insects, grow flowering vine privacy screens, and so much more. You’ll also learn how to tackle unique challenges, like windy conditions when gardening several stories above street level, and how to care for plants and troubleshoot with the best of them. From design basics to essential plant picks, “Small-Space Container Gardens” proves one doesn’t need a yard to have a garden.


The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-eye View of the World

The Botany of Desire: A Plant’s-eye View of the World

A farmer cultivates genetically modified potatoes so that a customer at McDonald’s half a world away can enjoy a long, golden french fry. A gardener plants tulip bulbs in the autumn and in the spring has a riotous patch of color to admire. Two simple examples of how humans act on nature to get what we want. Or are they? What if those potatoes and tulips have evolved to gratify certain human desires so that humans will help them multiply? What if, in other words, these plants are using us just as we use them? In blending history, memoir and superb science writing, Pollan tells the story of four domesticated species — the apple, the tulip, marijuana and the potato. All four plants are integral to our everyday lives and Pollan demonstrates how each has thrived by satisfying one of humankind’s most basic desires. Weaving fascinating anecdote and accessible science, Pollan takes the reader on an absorbing journey through the landscape of botany and desire. It is a journey that will change the way we think about our place in nature.


Food Not Lawns: How to Turn Your Yard Into a Garden and Your Neighborhood Into a Community

Food Not Lawns: How to Turn Your Yard Into a Garden and Your Neighborhood Into a Community

Gardening can be a political act. Creativity, fulfillment, connection, revolution–it all begins when we get our hands in the dirt. “Food Not Lawns” combines practical wisdom on ecological design and community-building with a fresh, green perspective on an age-old subject. Activist and urban gardener Heather Flores shares her nine-step permaculture design to help farmsteaders and city dwellers alike build fertile soil, promote biodiversity, and increase natural habitat in their own gardens. This joyful permaculture lifestyle manual inspires readers to apply the principles of the paradise garden–simplicity, resourcefulness, creativity, mindfulness, and community–to all aspects of life. Plant “guerilla gardens” in barren intersections and medians; organize community meals; start a street theater troupe or host a local art swap; free your kitchen from refrigeration and enjoy truly fresh, nourishing foods from your own plot of land; work with children to create garden play spaces. Flores cares passionately about the damaged state of our environment and the ills of our throwaway society. In “Food Not Lawns”, she shows us how to reclaim the earth one garden at a time.

 

 

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