Fall Fiction Books for Foodies

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Fall makes us think of pie, pumpkins and all kinds of sweet treats. It inspired us to take a look at some great fiction for foodies. From romance to mysteries, cozy up with one of these comforting, but fast-paced reads this Fall. Need more inspiration? Take a look at our Fiction page for more ideas.

 

9780786890378Cranberry Queen by Kathleen DeMarco

Diana Moore is 33 and about, so her Aunt Margaret predicts, to have the best three years she’s ever had. Which is a relief since tomorrow she’s facing a friend’s wedding, to which her ex (aka The Monster) complete with New Girlfriend, is also invited.

But somehow Aunt Margaret’s got it wrong. And next day everything else seems absurdly irrelevant when the car containing her mother, father and only brother has collided with a large truck on a small road. And from that moment on everything she’s know is changed.

 

9780425269961Comfort Food by Kate Jacobs

Cooking personality Augusta Simpson determines to take her show to Number 1 to remove the threat of a younger presenter being brought in as co-host.

The format of her show will be a series of intimate dinners where she teaches a group of younger people to make rich, sensuous meals — real food for real people — nourishing the soul as well as tempting the tastebuds. 

 

9780758280374Blackberry Pie Murder by Joanna Fluke

Hannah’s on the trail of a baker with a penchant for murder.

It’s been a sleepy summer for the folks of Lake Eden, Minnesota. In fact, it’s been a whole four months since anyone in the Swensen family has come across a dead body. And that means Hannah Swensen can finally focus on her bakery. . .or can she? 

 

 

9780312424794The Noodle Maker by Ma Jian

A darkly funny novel about the absurdities and cruelties of life in modern China.

Every week, a writer of political propaganda and a professional blood donor meet for dinner. They are unlikely friends — and over the course of one especially gastronomic evening, the writer starts to complain about his latest Party commission: the story of an ordinary soldier who sacrifices his life to the revolutionary cause. This is not the novel he wants to write, he tells his friend. Inside his head lives an unwritten book about the people he knows or sees everyday on the streets — people whose lives are far more representative of the world in which he lives. 

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