Contemporary Irish Authors

Just in time for St. Patrick’s Day, our focus this month is on the rich and complex history of the Irish culture. Known for it’s lush landscapes and long-standing cultural traditions, Ireland has produced some of the greatest writers of all times.

That tradition continues to this day with contemporary Irish authors who are masters of their craft. This St. Patrick’s day, why not travel to Ireland within the pages of one of these great books!

 

The Granta Book of the Irish Short Story

The Granta Book of the Irish Short Story

Lyrical, dark, comic or iconoclastic, the Irish short story has always punched well above its weight. Anne Enright has brought together a dazzling collection of Irish stories by authors born in the twentieth century – from Mary Lavin and Frank O’Connor to Claire Keegan and Kevin Barry. With a pithy and passionate introduction by Enright, The Granta Book of the Irish Short Story traces this great tradition through decades of social change and shows the pleasure Irish writers continue to take in the short-story form. Deft and often devastating, the short story dodges the rolling mythologies of Irish life to produce truths that are delightful and real. Also includes stories by: Maeve Brennan, Roddy Doyle, Mary Lavin, Colum McCann, William Trevor, John McGahern, Colm Toibin, Claire Keegan and Kevin Barry


Rebel Sisters

Rebel Sisters

Published for the 100th anniversary of the Easter Rising, Rebel Sisters is the Number One Irish bestseller from award-winning novelist Marita Conlon-McKenna, who writes with all the emotional depth and warmth of Maeve Binchy. With the threat of the First World War looming, tension simmers under the surface of Ireland. Growing up in the privileged confines of Dublin’s leafy Rathmines, the bright, beautiful Gifford sisters Grace, Muriel and Nellie kick against the conventions of their wealthy Anglo-Irish background and their mother Isabella’s expectations. Soon, as war erupts across Europe, the spirited sisters find themselves caught up in their country’s struggle for freedom. Muriel falls deeply in love with writer Thomas MacDonagh, artist Grace meets the enigmatic Joe Plunkett – both leaders of ‘The Rising’ – while Nellie joins the Citizen Army and bravely takes up arms, fighting alongside Countess Constance Markievicz in the rebellion. On Easter Monday, 1916, the biggest uprising in Ireland for two centuries begins. The world of the Gifford sisters and everyone they hold dear will be torn apart in a fight that is destined for tragedy.


This Must Be the Place

This Must Be the Place

Meet Daniel Sullivan, a man with a complicated life. A New Yorker living in the wilds of Ireland, he has children he never sees in California, a father he loathes in Brooklyn, and a wife, Claudette, who is a reclusive ex–film star given to pulling a gun on anyone who ventures up their driveway. Claudette was once the most glamorous and infamous woman in cinema before she staged her own disappearance and retreated to blissful seclusion in an Irish farmhouse. But the life Daniel and Claudette have so carefully constructed is about to be disrupted by an unexpected discovery about a woman Daniel lost touch with twenty years ago. This revelation will send him off-course, far away from wife, children, and home. Will his love for Claudette be enough to bring him back?


Drowning the Gowns

Drowning the Gowns

At the turn of the 19th century, an Irish artist living in Venice spots a famous American writer dumping a batch of gowns into the Laguna in the middle of the night. Mystified by this, Reuben Ross tracks down the writer, later rather clumsily revealed to be Henry James, and accompanies him on his jaunts around Venice in search of a lost love and her secrets. As Reuben attempts to unravel the mystery, he finds himself adrift in the city’s mist-shrouded maze of canals and waterways, entangled in ghostly and political intrigues that span the American Civil War, the Irish Home Rule Crisis and the First World War. Seeking to find the truth, Reuben risks losing his mind as he gradually discovers there is more to drowning these gowns than the mere disposal of unwanted belongings.


The Wonder

The Wonder

An eleven-year-old girl stops eating, but remains miraculously alive and well. A nurse, sent to investigate whether she is a fraud, meets a journalist hungry for a story. Set in the Irish Midlands in the 1850s, Emma Donoghue’s The Wonder – inspired by numerous European and North American cases of ‘fasting girls’ between the sixteenth century and the twentieth – is a psychological thriller about a child’s murder threatening to happen in slow motion before our eyes. Pitting all the seductions of fundamentalism against sense and love, it is a searing examination of what nourishes us, body and soul.

 

 

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