On the Motives Which Led Husserl to Transcendental Idealism

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Roman Ingarden studied under Husserl before and during the first world war. He belonged to the so-called Gottingen group of Husserl's pupils. Husserl's doctrine was accepted by them and interpreted in a realist vein. Ingarden defended this view all his life. He opposed the development of phenomenology towards idealism. A considerable part of Ingarden's great creative effort is dedicated to the construction of a realist phenomenology and thus, according to him, to continuing the erection of the theoret- ical structure whose ...

On the Motives Which Led Husserl to Transcendental Idealism 1975, Springer

ISBN-13: 9789024717514

Softcover Reprint of the Origi edition

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