Medieval writers never seemed to tire of debating the nature of women: were they good or bad? Victims or shrews? Were they most truly represented by Dido, Penelope and Lucretia, or by Eve, Delilah and Clytemnestra? When Chaucer began to write, he was confronted with the problem of how "woman" was to be represented in terms that broke free of these traditional polarities, and even more importantly, with the problem of how she was to be evaluated for herself, rather than endlessly evaluated from the male standpoint implied in ...

Geoffrey Chaucer 1991, Humanities Press Intl

ISBN-13: 9780391037083

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Geoffrey Chaucer 1991, Humanities Press Intl

ISBN-13: 9780391037076

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Geoffrey Chaucer 1990, Prentice-Hall, Harlow

ISBN-13: 9780710812759

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